There are a lot of people who have quilts that have been passed down from generation to generation. We have three quilts that are from Doug’s grandmother and great-grandmother. Over the years we have talked about getting them appraised for insurance purposes but never managed to get it done. There are normally quilt appraisers at quilt shows but I have either been working the shows in my booth, teaching classes, or I am there with friends and just haven’t been able to take advantage of the opportunity.

The quilt above was made for Doug’s grandfather as he was leaving for service in WWI by his mother and sisters.

There was a quilt show in Orlando last week and I was going to the show with my girlfriends one day to shop and look at all the quilts on display. I realized there was going to be an appraiser there and decided to take advantage of the show being local to go a second day and finally have the quilts appraised. I found that it really isn’t difficult to do. For this show I just had to register online in advance for admission to the show and schedule three half hour appointments with the appraiser, one per quilt.

The day of my appointments I took my quilts to the booth. There were several tables put together where the quilt was spread out. The appraiser, Joyce, looked over each quilt individually, taking pictures of the quilt, the embroideries and the fabrics used. She asked questions about who made it, as well as when and where it was made. We talked about the types of fabrics included in each quilt. In our case two of the quilts are crazy quilts. Joyce noted they were made from all kinds of fabrics: corduroy, suiting, dress and shirt fabrics. She asked if they were made by a tailor or seamstress since there were so many different fabrics. Doug and I found this really funny considering I make quilts for people out of those very kinds of fabrics now in my memory quilting business.

Thia quilt was also made by Doug’s great-grandmother.

I learned a lot about how appraisals are done by doing this. Joyce wanted to know everything I could find out about the history of the quilts. Knowing as much as possible about the quilt helps her to date the quilt and fabrics and give the best appraisal possible. You could also tell that she really enjoyed hearing the stories that went with the quilts and had a genuine interest in the history of the quilts beyond her job.

Since in this case the appraisals were taking place in a booth in the show I had to pay admission to the show and then pay her a fee of $50 per quilt. I have found this is a pretty standard price for appraisals. For those of you who don’t know much about quilt appraisers it is something that takes a lot of knowledge and education in the history of quilting and quilt fabrics & textiles. There is a certification process involved so you know they know their stuff.

There are many reasons to have your quilt appraised:

Secure Insurance Coverage

Making a Donation for the Quilt

Settle an estate

Shipping a quilt for a show or contest

Selling a quilt

Curiosity

If you are interested in having a quilt appraised check out any area quilt shows to see if they have an appraiser scheduled. You can also contact Professional Association of Appraisers – Quilted Textiles at http://paaqt.com for the names of appraisers in your area.

Whether you are a quilter or just have family quilts that have been passed down to you this is something you should think about doing. It would be expensive for a quilter to do all of his or her quilts but you should definitely get appraised those quilts that you have taken a great deal of time with and are of a more intricate nature.

Hope you have learned something from my latest adventure as I have.  If you have any questions about the process please feel free to ask.

Have a great weekend.

Trish